FKBP1A binds sirolimus

Stable Identifier
R-HSA-9679044
Type
Reaction [binding]
Species
Homo sapiens
Compartment
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Sirolimus is a macrolide compound obtained from Streptomyces hygroscopicus that acts by selectively blocking the transcriptional activation of cytokines thereby inhibiting cytokine production. It is bioactive only when bound to immunophilins. Sirolimus is a potent immunosuppressant and possesses both antifungal and antineoplastic properties. Sirolimus inhibits T lymphocyte activation and proliferation that occurs in response to antigenic and cytokine (Interleukin IL-2, IL-4, and IL-15) stimulation by a mechanism that is distinct from that of other immunosuppressants. Sirolimus also inhibits antibody production. In cells, sirolimus binds to the immunophilin, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (FKBP1A, FKBP-12), to generate an immunosuppressive complex. The sirolimus:FKBP1A complex has no effect on calcineurin activity (Bierer et al. 1991). This complex binds to and inhibits the activation of the mammalian Target Of Rapamycin (mTOR), a key regulatory kinase. This inhibition suppresses cytokine-driven T-cell proliferation, inhibiting the progression from the G1 to the S phase of the cell cycle (Sehgal 1998, 2003).

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